Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Theme 7: INTERDEPENDENCE IN NATURE

Theme 7: INTERDEPENDENCE IN NATURE
Explanation: Living organisms rarely exist alone in nature.
Clarification: You would post here examples of how organisms must interact together to live successfully.

7 comments:

saad said...

MUTUALISM: A mutualistic relationship exists between plants and bacteria such as rhizobium. Both organisms benefit as the plant receives nitrogen from from the bacteria which break down unusable nitrogen into a usable form. The bacteria receives nutrients such as CHO's. The bacteria also receive shelter and protection.

saad said...

ECOLOGY: In commensalism one species benefits and the other is neither harmed nor benefitted. Certain tropical fish have had adaptations which allow them to live among the stinging tentacles of sea anemones. The tentacles would harm other fish. The fish receive protection and food from the detritus left from the meals of the anemones. The sea anemone does not receive anything in return.

Shannah S. said...

Symbiosis: Two species of organisms live togehter to benefit one or both organisms.
An example of Parasitic Symbiosis is that the cuckoo and cowbird practice brood parasitism, laying eggs in other birds' nests to be raised by the foster parents.

KellyP said...

Mutualism: a mutualistic relationship is the perfect answer to explain how cows can digest cellulose. bacteria live in the it digestive system helping them digest cellulose rich meals and they are both gaining food and energy from this.

saad said...

ECOLOGY: Some species are indirectly dependent on each other. Vultures are scavengers which feed on dead organisms like cows. If a vulture population decrease then there will be more dead, decaying cows. If the dead cows stay on the fields then dogs will get to them. The dogs will eat the rotten meant and increases rabies in the dog population who can affect humans.

saad said...
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saad said...

Parasitism is a type of symbiosis where one organism benefits while the other is usually harmed in some way. Some parasites affect the behaviors of their host, usually causing their death. A parasitic flatworm in ants lives in ants but lives in large herbivores during adulthood. The flatworm migrates to the brain of the ant and causes the ant to climb the top of a vegetation and lock itself onto a grassblade so it is eaten by the herbivore.